Jacksonville Forest Park V 02-Sep-2018

Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon

After our big adventure in Canada and Alaska, a visit by Wayne and Diane as they motorcycled their way to Glacier National Park, and catching-up on a back-log of library volunteerism, we were ready for a Labor Day stay-cation.  Wildfire smoke was still around, but shifting winds cleared it out for a long hike in Prescott Park on Friday and it hadn’t fully returned when we decided to do a hike in Jacksonville Forest Park today. This park is a tremendous outdoor resource for when we don’t want to (or can’t) travel far to hike.  Our map of the hiking and biking trails in the 1,100-acre park is getting pretty ragged but we were still able to pick-out a short loop (5 miles; 1,500 feet of elevation gain) involving some trails we hadn’t hiked before.

So, from parking area P-1, we took the Rail Trail to the Ponderosa Snag Trail to the Siskiyou Trail, then a long stretch on that to the Halls of Manzanita Trail. We followed that one up Cantrall Creek Canyon to parking area P-6 and continued on it west of the road.  Here we encountered the newish (it’s not shown on our old map) Steep Canyon Rangers Trail and decided to see where it went.  It took us to the Naversen Family Trail, which connected us to the Ridgeview Trail and then the Norling Trail, past the old reservoir (now a wetland), and back to P-1 by noon.  Pleasant hiking weather in the morning, with smoke apparent on the horizon but not too noticeable on the trail.

Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Starting out on the Rail Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Along the Ponderosa Snag Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
We both find madrone bark endlessly fascinating
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
On the Siskiyou Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Passing through a stand of madrones on the Siskiyou Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
More madrone bark abstractions
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
On the Halls of Manzanita Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
The smoke-hazed view from the Halls of Manzanita Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Encountering the Steep Canyon Rangers Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Along the Steep Canyon Rangers Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Down the Naversen Family Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Along the Ridgeview Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Over the Confluence Bridge near where Jackson and Cantrall Creeks meet
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Along the Norling Trail
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Moon over the old Jacksonville Reservoir (now a wetland)
Jacksonville Forest Park Oregon
Remnants of a weir on Jackson Creek at P-1

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6 thoughts on “Jacksonville Forest Park V 02-Sep-2018

    1. Entirely natural and entirely fascinating. You could spend a LOT of time just photographing the multitude of abstract (and some not so abstract) shapes that the madrones offer up.

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  1. Funny thing, were there hiking some of those trails from 11 am till around 1 pm. We even parked in P1, so your vehicle must have been there when we arrived. In regards to the maps, signs and getting lost, yes there are still some issues, but many trails have markers and a few parking areas have large maps to show you where you are at which we have found helpful. I think that they keep creating new trails and are reluctant to keep printing new maps as a result. They do have “route” card at the main P1 parking area where you can pick out your distance for a hike and they tell you which trails to take and when to turn onto another trail. That can help too.

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    1. We favor the early start, so we were almost back when you were starting. Ships in the night. We’re never really lost, just a mite confused from time to time. But much fun is to be had just wandering those trails. 😊

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  2. I regularly meet up with a friend that lives in Jacksonville to hike in Jacksonville Forest Park. It’s become a running joke with us that THIS time we won’t get lost. It’s easy enough to make our way back to the car, but we find the maps and trail signs unclear.

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    1. We were lucky to find one of the park’s map brochures on our first visit – otherwise we’d probably still be wandering around out there! But that map is missing the Steep Canyon Rangers Trail. It can also be confusing when it calls an old road (like the Arrowhead Pass Trail) a single-track trail. Still it’s a great resource to have so close and we too EVENTUALLY find our car! 🙂

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